Lenovo Legion 5 Pro Review: The Right Gaming Laptop For Most

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Lenovo’s Legion lineup consists of different varieties of gaming laptops—from the thin-and-light Slim 7 to the high-end Legion 7. And in this review, I’ll be discussing the new Lenovo Legion 5 Pro which is a 16” gaming laptop with all the latest processors, alongside a distinct design language to help it stand out among the crowd. Let’s begin.

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Lenovo Legion 5 Pro Specifications:

  • Design & Build: Plastic/anodized aluminum hybrid build, 14.02(W) x 10.25-10.41(D) x 0.85-1.07(H) inches, 2.45 kg
  • Color Options: Storm Grey, Stingray White
  • Display: 16″ anti-glare IPS panel, 165Hz refresh rate, 100% sRGB, 500 nits brightness, 178° viewing angle
  • Display Properties: VESA HDR 400, Dolby Vision, Free-Sync, G-Sync, 3ms response time, DC dimmer, X-Rite Pantone factory color calibration
  • Resolution: WQXGA (2560×1600) resolution, 16:10 aspect ratio
  • Keyboard: Full-size backlit (4-zone RGB) keys
  • Trackpad: Mylar surface (plastic) multi-touch trackpad, Windows Precision drivers
  • Security: TPM 2.0 chip, No fingerprint sensor
  • Processor: AMD Ryzen 7 5800H CPU (Cezanne), 8C/16T, 4.4GHz Max Turbo Frequency, 16MB L3 Cache, 7nm process, 45W TDP
  • RAM: 16GB DDR4-3200MHz (2x 8GB), Up to 32GB
  • Storage: 512GB M.2 PCIe 3.0 NVMe SSD (2x M.2 slots total)
  • Graphics: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3060 (130W), 6GB GDDR6 VRAM
  • Audio: 2x 2W stereo speakers, Nahimic Audio
  • Battery: 80 Watt-hours 4-cell Li-Po battery
  • Power Supply: 300W slim tip (3-pin) AC power adapter
  • Webcam: 720p HD camera, E-camera shutter, Dual-array microphones
  • Connectivity: WiFi 6 (ax), Bluetooth 5.1
  • I/O Ports: 4x USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A (1x Always On), 2x USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-C (1x Power Delivery), 1x HDMI 2.1, 1x 3.5mm combo audio jack, 1x RJ45 (LAN), 1x power connector
  • Price in Nepal: Rs. 250,000 (Ryzen 7 5800H, RTX 3060, 16GB RAM, 512GB SSD)
  • What’s inside the box: Laptop, power adapter, quick start guide

Lenovo Legion 5 Pro Review:

Design

  • 14.02(W) x 10.25(D) x 0.85(H) inches, 2.45 kg
  • Plastic, anodized aluminum hybrid build quality

As usual, let’s kick things off with the design. Coming from the HP Omen 15, one could say that this is a flashier-looking laptop. Especially with that Legion “Y” branding on the lid which glows steady white when you have the power plugged in. But if that’s a little too much, you can always disable it with the “Fn + L” shortcut.

Lenovo Legion 5 Pro - Design

Anyway, the Legion 5 Pro is pretty well-built. It features anodized aluminum material on the lid and the bottom chassis—while the keyboard deck and trackpad are all plastic-made. And thanks to their matte finish, this laptop doesn’t attract fingerprints or smudges as much either.

But weighing 2.45kg, it is one of the heaviest laptops I’ve tested this year. Add the comically large power adapter into the mix, then you’re looking at quite the bulky setup with the Legion 5 Pro. However, it’s crucial to understand that Lenovo has fitted a 16” display on this 15.6” chassis.

the added heft does bring a larger screen real-estate which I’m sure is a fine trade-off for many.

The bezels are minimal all-around to accommodate a 16:10 aspect ratio but you can still argue that the bottom bezel could’ve been smaller. I mean, take the Asus ROG Zephyrus M16 for instance. It has a similar 16” 16:10 display like this one, but Asus has managed to deliver a relatively slimmer chin. Of course, it’s not a deal-breaker to anyone, so I’ll let it pass.

Ports, lots of ports

Moving on, the Legion 5 Pro has quite a sturdy hinge. Although it can’t lay 180° flat, it’s subject to minimal wobbles and feels robust enough to ward off any durability concerns. And yeah, you can pop it open with one hand as well. Getting to ports, this gaming laptop has every I/O you need.

There’s a 3.5mm combo audio jack and a USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-C with DisplayPort 1.4 support on the left. Similarly, the opposite side hosts a USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A and a camera-kill E-shutter button. With Lenovo laptops, we’re used to seeing dedicated camera shutter buttons where the webcam is.

And I’m not sure if this implementation is as good as that. Folks extra-concern


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